Authors on the Hill Presents: Professor Stephanie Reents

On Wednesday, April 3rd at 4:30pm, join Professor Stephanie Reents for a reading and discussion of her recent publication, “I Meant to Kill Ye.”

After teaching Cormac McCarthy’s bloodiest, most challenging novel to her students for years, Stephanie Reents feels no closer to the strange void at the heart of Blood Meridian than when she began. So she journeys west, following the trail of the historical Glanton Gang across the desert landscape that McCarthy loves. In his archives, she discovers an obscure note about the kid—the novel’s enigmatic protagonist—that might explain why this infamous novel is so hard to shake. This is part of Fiction Advocate’s Afterwords series. https://www.spdbooks.org/Products/9780999431603/i-meant-to-kill-ye-cormac-mccarthys-blood-meridian.aspx

This event is free and open to the public, and will be held in the Levis Browsing Room of Dinand Library. Light refreshments will be served. For questions, contact Outreach Librarian Laura Wilson at llwilson@holycross.edu, or at 508-793-3886.

Authors on the Hill Presents: Professor Jonathan Mulrooney

Authors on the Hill presents Professor Jonathan Mulrooney.  March 27, 2019.  4:30 pm.  Dinand Browsing Room.

On Wednesday, March 27th at 4:30 pm, join Professor Jonathan Mulrooney for a reading and discussion of his recent publication, “Romanticism and Theatrical Experience: Kean, Hazlitt and Keats in the Age of Theatrical News .”

Bringing together studies in theater history, print culture, and literature, this book offers a new consideration of Romantic-period writing in Britain. Recovering a wide range of theatrical criticism from newspapers and periodicals, some of it overlooked since its original publication in Regency London, Jonathan Mulrooney explores new contexts for the work of the actor Edmund Kean, essayist William Hazlitt, and poet John Keats. Kean’s ongoing presence as a figure in the theatrical news presented readers with a provocative re-imagining of personal subjectivity and a reworking of the British theatrical tradition. Hazlitt and Keats, in turn, imagined the essayist and the poet along similar theatrical lines, reframing Romantic prose and poetics. Taken together, these case studies illustrate not only theater’s significance to early nineteenth-century Londoners, but also the importance of theater’s textual legacies for our own re-assessment of ‘Romanticism’ as a historical and cultural phenomenon. https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/romanticism-and-theatrical-experience/EB33BA1159A428A8E7DF62457F0CA7C2#fndtn-information

This event is free and open to the public, and will be held in the Levis Browsing Room of Dinand Library. Light refreshments will be served. For questions, contact Outreach Librarian Laura Wilson at llwilson@holycross.edu, or at 508-793-3886.